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"May blessings be upon the head of Cadmus, the Phoenicians, or whoever it was that invented books." -Thomas Carlyle

Welcome to my virtual book collection. Since collecting actual books is somewhat cost-prohibitive, I've begun to amass all of the books I would love to have if I had the means. Some are new, lots are old, all are unique or beautiful or unusual or in some other way have captured my fancy. Enjoy browsing!

Special Collections: Fine Bindings ~ Fairies and Fairy Tales ~ Terror and Madness ~ Poetry ~ Food, Drink and Apothecary ~ Science Fiction ~ Illuminations, Lettering and Hand-Coloring ~ Magic ~ Supernatural and Occult ~ Alchemy ~ Science and Technical ~ Maritime ~ Costumes ~ Humor ~ Children's books ~ Legend of King Arthur ~ Americana ~ 18th Century ~ 19th Century

Authors and illustrators: Edgar Allan Poe ~ Jules Verne ~ Edmund Dulac ~ Kay Nielsen ~ Arthur Rackham ~ Edward Gorey ~ Charles Dickens ~ H.P. Lovecraft ~ William Hope Hodgson ~ Mark Twain ~ Lewis Carroll ~ Salvador Dali ~ George Cruikshank ~ Emily Dickinson ~ Geoffrey Chaucer ~ H.G. Wells

Posts tagged magic.

Twentieth Century Magic and Construction of Modern Magical Apparatus…
Hopkins, Nevil Monroe. George Routledge & Sons, New York, 1898.

[2], vi, 160 pp. Illustrations in text. (8vo) original brown cloth stamped in black and white, spine lettered in gilt. First Edition.

With chapters on Mechanical, Chemical and Electrical magic, including; The Design and Equipment of a Magical Stage, The Flight of the Timepieces, The Miniature Inferno, Spirit Chirography, and The Demon Candlesticks.

The Juggler’s Oracle; or, The Whole Art of Legerdemain Laid Open
Herman Boaz. London, William Cole, 1826.

Consisting of all the newest and most surprising tricks and experiments, with cards, cups and balls, conveyance of money and rings, boxes, fire, strings and knots; with many curious experiments by optical illusion, chymical changes, and magical cards, 16mo, 40 engravings, paper boards

Herman Boaz was a German conjuror. During the last decade of the 18th century and in the earlier part of the 19th century, he appeared in Britain as the Sieur Boaz. In “The Lives of the Conjurors” (1876), Thomas Frost refers to him as a “small fry of the profession”. The Caledonian Conjuror, Mr Arbuckle, stated that he was one of Boaz’s pupils on his billing. In “Miracle Mongers and their Methods”, Houdini mentions that on his programme, Boaz employed a fire-eater billed as the “Man-Salamander”. Scarce.

How to Read People’s Minds
H.J. Burlingame. Chicago, 1891 and Chicago, 1905.

Two Volumes, Illustrations, Stanley Collins’ copy, with his inscription to endpaper and bookplate to pastedown, modern half cloth, original wrappers bound in, Chicago, 1905; Leaves from Conjurers’ Scrap Books, illustrations, original cloth.

Magic - Bibliotheca Acta et Scripta Magica
Eberhard David Hauber.
Lemgo, Joh. Heinrich Rener, 1739-1738-1745.

Sir Matthew Hale, 1716.

A Short Treatise touching Sheriffs Accompts, advertisement leaf at beginning, J.Walthoe, 1716; A Tryal of Witches, at the Assizes held at Bury St.Edmonds…1664, for D.Brown…, 1716; A Discourse touching Provision for the Poor, for D.Brown…, 1716, together 3 works in 1 vol.

A Treatise of the Sibyls….
David Blondell. London: Printed by T.R. for the author, 1661. 4to. Calf.

From krownspellman.com: “Blondel (1591-1655) Protestant minister and celebrated civil and ecclesiastical historian. He was invited to succeed Vossius at Amsterdam, sadly there the weather impaired his health and he lost his sight. His work on the Sibyls of the ancients is a fund of information gathered by Blondel on Sibylline literature with a skeptics eye looking for frauds and impostures. 'The Sibyl was no witch, or prophetess, or 'damsel possessed with the spirit of divination', rather she seems to have gathered into her person all the mystery and reverential awe which attach to a communication from an unknown and intangible world.” [Hastings, Elncyclopedia of religion and Ethics]

The Juggler’s Oracle; or, The Whole Art of Legerdemain Laid Open
Herman Boaz. London, William Cole, 1826.

Consisting of all the newest and most surprising tricks and experiments, with cards, cups and balls, conveyance of money and rings, boxes, fire, strings and knots; with many curious experiments by optical illusion, chymical changes, and magical cards, 16mo, 40 engravings, paper boards

Herman Boaz was a German conjuror. During the last decade of the 18th century and in the earlier part of the 19th century, he appeared in Britain as the Sieur Boaz. In “The Lives of the Conjurors” (1876), Thomas Frost refers to him as a “small fry of the profession”. The Caledonian Conjuror, Mr Arbuckle, stated that he was one of Boaz’s pupils on his billing. In “Miracle Mongers and their Methods”, Houdini mentions that on his programme, Boaz employed a fire-eater billed as the “Man-Salamander”. Scarce.

tutuscircushats:

Illustrated by Victor Gad.

(via graveyarddirt)

AMULETIC SCROLL OF THE ALCHEMIST JOHANNES MICHAEL, in German and Latin, decorated manuscript on vellum [Germany, late 16th or early 17th century]

A scroll (5 membranes), 2710mm. by 95mm., with coloured roundels on the obverse containing complex alchemical talismans, each above a line or so of text in cursive black ink in German or Latin explaining their use, on the reverse a number of prayers and prayer-like texts listing names of Evangelists and alchemical terms, and naming the owner of the scroll in lighter brown ink as Johannes Michael, these texts separated by elaborate crosses and roundels.

CATALOGUE NOTE
This scroll is an alchemist’s practical reference tool from the greatest years of the study of this philosophical and pseudo-chemical art. It lists some 34 designs for alchemical talismans (presumably to be painted on walls, doors or the body), littered with the traditional symbols for mercury, copper, gold and at the head of one of the larger talismans, the elusive philosopher’s stone locked within the Seal of Solomon. The simple talismans at the beginning of the scroll offer protection against neid und haß (anger and hate), den bösen geiß (the evil spirits) and Zauberij (witchcraft). Those at the end incorportate a number of simple units as well as symbols taken from an angelic alphabet (evidently influenced by the so-called Alphabet of the Magi invented by the celebrated astronomer and alchemist Paracelsus, 1493-1541), and offer more specific protection against failure in war and imprisonment.

A Magician Among the Spirits
Harry Houdini. Harper and Bros, NY, 1924.

294 pp. Illustrations from photographs, etc. (8vo) original blue cloth lettered and bordered in gilt, dust jacket. First Edition.

The famous magician offers his opinions on the Spiritualists of his day. Includes chapters on Spirit Photography, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, etc. Very scarce in the original dust jacket.

Physical Amusements and Diverting Experiments Composed and Performed in Different Capitals of Europe, and in London.
Giuseppe Pinetti. London, [no publisher], 1784.

Giusepe Pinetti (1750-?1800) was one of the leading magicians of the last quarter of the eighteenth century. Physical Amusements, published in the same year as the first edition printed in Paris, describes his most celebrated illusions, including: “Curious method of restoring life, in two minutes, a fly that has been drowned even twenty-four hours”, “To change a colour of a rose”, “How to shoot a swallow flying… and after, to find means to bring it to life again”, “A curious secret to make a card pass from one hand to the other” (and four other card tricks), “To extinguish a wax candle at eight or a hundred paces distance, by firing a gun loaded with ball…”, “To pull off any person’s shirt, without undressing him”.

The Conjuror’s Magazine or Magical and Physiognomical Mirror

2 vol.in one, 2 engraved frontispieces, engraved table relating to the planets, lacking the plates after Lavater, woodcut diagrams in text, extensive annotations in a neat contemporary hand over the title-page and areas of the following four leaves, further annotations throughout, mainly in margins, contemporary half calf, [Toole Stott: Conjuring 179], 8vo, W.Locke, 1971-1792.

*** The rare first periodical to contain contributions about conjuring. Toole Stott states that the plates are more often than not missing. A third volume retitled The Astrologer’s Magazine contained no conjuring material.The annotations are by a John Mills, with a brief index inside upper cover, a note that the book was bound by John Townley of Hoxton, and descriptions of remarkable events.

thefindesiecle:

Strobridge & Co. Lith., Kellar in his latest mystery, c.1898 (via).

(aleyma)

#Magic  #Mystery  
via aleyma

CHALDEAN MAGIC (First UK Edition) London: Samuel Bagster and Sons, 1877.

Translated from the French with considerable additions by the Author and notes by the Editor. vg copy. Hb. Green cloth cover with black lettering, design and illustration to front; and black bands, bright gilt lettering and bright gilt symbols to spine.

The work draws largely from a tablet from the library of the Royal Palace at Nineveh which contains numerous formulas of ‘deprecatory incantations against evil spirits, the effects of sorcery, disease etc. ” A fascinating insight into the magical practices the Chaldeans, with 31 chapters which include Mythology of the Underworld; Magic and Sorcery of the Chaldeans; and Chaldean Demonology.

Via Motus Books

A collection of works, including some first editions, by Harry Houdini(pseudonym of Erich Weiss)

Lot includes:
Miracle Mongers and Their Methods, New York, E.P. Hutton, 1920; A Magician Among the Spirits, New York, Harper, 1924, FIRST EDITIONS; Houdini’s Paper Magic, second impression, colour frontispiece, George Routledge, 1922; [with JAMES WILLIAM ELLIOTT] Elliott’s Last Legacy. Secrets of the King of All Kard Kings, New York, Adams, 1923, publisher’s cloth; Magical Rope Ties and Escapes, publisher’s pictorial boards, Will Goldston, [c.1925]; The Right Way to Do Wrong. An Exposé of Successful Criminals, upper hinge broken, FIRST EDITION, Boston, Harry Houdini, 1906; Houdini Exposes the Tricks Used by the Boston Medium “Margery”, spine strengthened with tape, New York, Adams, 1924, publisher’s wrappers, 8vo (7)

via Bonham’s

 
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